What are the best foods to increase your flexibility?

Elite nutritionist Freddy Brown fills us in on what foods you can incorporate into your training diet to increase your fighting flexibility and give you the edge in the ring and on the mats

05 November 2012    |    0 Comments

email this article Print this article Share this article with facebook Share this article with twitter
Image courtesy of: Fighting Fit

To read Freddy's full list of flexibility foods, click here to get yourself a copy of last month's issue of Fighting Fit. To buy this edition via our app, please click here.

VENISON for nerve function
Flexibility training looks to manipulate the 'stretch reflex' to allow you to overcome your body's muscle-protecting mechanisms. When a muscle is stretched, sensors known as golgi tendon organs send a signal to the central nervous system that then causes a nervous response to contract the muscle. Most flexibility training revolves around trying to dampen this reflex and change the neural signalling to and from the muscle. Venison, a lean red meat, contains high concentrations of creatine and b-vitamins, including B12 and betain, a b-vitamin derivative. Creatine supplementation has been seen to support the nerve-functions of ageing populations suffering from degenerative disease, support the cognition of vegetarians (who naturally have lower levels of creatine) and improve athletes' reaction times after sleep deprivation. Supplementing with betain has been shown to enhance strength adaptation without increasing muscular size in trained populations.

JELLY for tissue compliance
Unsurprisingly, another important factor in influencing our flexibility is the stretchiness, or compliance, of the tissues that hold our muscles together. Not only is the fascia, the tough sheath encasing our muscle-cells, adaptive and influences an athlete's flexibility, but the ligaments and tendons that fasten the muscles to each other and our bones also affect an athlete’s suppleness. If you want to enhance your own connective tissue...eat something made out of connective tissue! Gelatine (made from boiled cow’s bones) will provide the rich source of proline necessary for collagen remodelling, whilst the added sugar will support your training load. Rather boringly, one of the most important factors in preventing injury and muscle tears is preventing fatigue. If you are properly fuelled for your training sessions you are less likely to suffer from the catabolic state that ensues, and more likely to bounce back after back-breaking training sessions.

To read Freddy's full list of flexibility foods, click here to get yourself a copy of last month's issue of Fighting Fit. To buy this edition via our app, please click here.

  • Comments
  • Leave a comment

Fighting Fit is published by Newsquest Specialist Media, the world’s leading combat sport publisher. Other titles include Boxing News, The Boxing News Annual and The Boxing News Health & Fitness Series

Please note all comments will be moderated before they are published. Please complete all fields marked with a *.
*Name:
Email:
Location:
*Comment: (no HTML allowed)

Characters Left
<< Enter the characters (without spaces) show in the image.